Conditional Port Deployment Using the Deployment Framework for BizTalk (BTDF)

Using the Deployment Framework for BizTalk  makes the normally painful task of performing a BizTalk deployment a lot easier. If you don’t know about it, I’d highly recommend taking a look into it. Once you get it going, you’ll find there’s no better way to do a BTS deployment.

Oftentimes while doing BizTalk work, I like to create “test ports” to help me unit test my BizTalk code or configuration. These are usually file-drop locations that I don’t want included in my regular deployment. I’ve found it to be somewhat painful a process to continually have to either add or remove these test locations, so I like to use the Deployment Framework’s capability to use XML Preprocess to selectively deploy a port.

Here’s how:

First, you’ll need to make sure the value of the RequireXmlPreprocessDirectives is set to “True” in the deployment project file. Then, in the PortBindingsMaster file, you simply comment out the port you want to be conditional and wrap it in a preprocessor directive like such:

<!-- ifdef ${_xml_preprocess} -->    
<!-- <ReceivePort Name="TEST" IsTwoWay="false" BindingOption="0">
      <Description xsi:nil="true" />
      <ReceiveLocations>
      <ReceiveLocation Name="TEST_FILE">
          <Description xsi:nil="true" />
          <Address>${someVariable}\*.xml</Address>
          …
      </ReceivePort> -->
<!-- endif -->

When you need to turn it off, you simply change the value of RequireXmlPreprocessDirectives to “False” and BTDF will treat your port definition as it would any other commented out code-it’ll ignore it.

One caveat to this approach, though, is that you’ll need to wrap ALL other variable-based definitions in the PortBindingsMaster with preprocessor directives as such:

<!-- ifdef ${_xml_preprocess} -->
<!-- <Address>mssql://${dbServerName}//${dbName}?</Address>-->
<!-- else -->
    <Address>mssql://${dbServerName}//${dbName}?</Address>
<!-- endif -->

Note that the “else” part isn’t commented out. That’s so that if the preprocessor is off, it will recognize it as normal text and BTDF will process accordingly.  Also notice that the “Address” part is identical. This is because I wanted it to work the same way regardless of whether we were going to require the preprocess directive or not. If I wanted to do something different I would simply change these values.

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Azure Logic Apps: 405 – Method Not Supported Errors from HttpListener

This one starts with a joke:

A gentleman walks up to a wall and starts banging his head against it.  Hard.  In fact, he bangs his head so hard, that people around grow concerned and one person says to him, “Sir, why do you keep banging your head against the wall?”  He replies, “Because it feels so good when I stop.”

So, like the gentleman in the above joke, I’ve been (figuratively) banging my head against the wall while trying to figure out how to invoke a Logic App I have deployed to the Azure cloud via an HttpListener.

I was using a PostAsync() call on the HttpClient to invoke the listener, but kept getting a 405 - Method Not Supported exception from the service. I was pretty sure POST should have been allowed! After checking the address, double-checking all the configurations, and so forth I couldn’t figure out why I would get the response I got (hence, the figurative banging of my head against a wall).

As is often the case, I found the answer in a post on an MSDN forum. When I copied the URL from the API definition of my HttpListener in Azure, it began with http instead of https, which was required.  A simple mistake and easy to miss.

After making the URL correction, adding an “s” to http, my calls to the service worked just fine.

And it feels really good now that I’ve stopped banging my head against the wall.

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